Mural - An Earth Worth Saving

KEEP DALTON-WHITFIELD BEAUTIFUL AND 1000 WORDS DALTON ART PROJECT CELEBRATED THE COMPLETION OF THE MURAL “AN EARTH WORTH SAVING” BY LOCAL ARTIST HENRY GREEN. THE MURAL IS LOCATED DOWNTOWN AT THE INTERSECTION OF THORNTON AVE. AND WAUGH ST.

KEEP DALTON-WHITFIELD BEAUTIFUL AND 1000 WORDS DALTON ART PROJECT CELEBRATED THE COMPLETION OF THE MURAL “AN EARTH WORTH SAVING” BY LOCAL ARTIST HENRY GREEN. THE MURAL IS LOCATED DOWNTOWN AT THE INTERSECTION OF THORNTON AVE. AND WAUGH ST.

The completion of the mural “An Earth Worth Saving” by local artist Henry Green was celebrated on Tuesday, April 12, 2016 with a ribbon cutting ceremony organized by the Greater Dalton Chamber of Commerce. The recycling and sustainability themed mural is sponsored by Keep Dalton-Whitfield Beautiful in partnership with 1000 Words Dalton Public Art Project. The new mural is located at the corner of Thornton Ave. and Waugh St. on the side of the MAPCO gas station across the street from the Dalton Green Park. (The mural is listed on the official 1000 Words website: http://www.1000wordsdalton.com/#/murals/)

Last fall Keep Dalton-Whitfield Beautiful’s recycling committee requested artist submissions through 1000 Words for a recycling and sustainability themed mural. Green’s design which included a view of planet Earth from space was ultimately chosen out of six different designs.

While the painting of the mural was done by Green, volunteers helped to prepare the wall for the new artwork during three work days. Teens from The City of Refuge who volunteered also helped Green select different animals to add to his design.

Conservation and recycling have always been important to me. One of the major components in the mural is the Earth. The Earth is comprised of recyclable materials. One item that is featured in particular as a recyclable object are water bottles. So many of these bottles are used and, if not recycled, will become a major part of our Earth in landfills and through dwindling resources. Every year people use enough plastic water bottles to wrap around the world twice. Recycling needs to be an part of everyone’s life in order for us to continue having the resources necessary to maintain life on the planet. Another part of the mural is the saying “What we save, saves us.” This directly ties to recycling because what we recycle saves the Earth by lessening our impact on vital resources and in turn those resources such as oxygen and clean water keep us alive. The trees on either side are an homage to the Tree of Life. Each tree is covered with animalsWhen we recycle paper, we save trees. When we save trees, they in turn provide oxygen for the planet and save us and all other living things who do not have a voice to speak for themselves. I want to be able to convey these ideas and truths to others through my work.
— Henry Green, Mural Artist

In the mural the Earth is is covered with plastic bottles bringing attention to the amount of plastic being used but not recycled. By not recycling we produce more waste, litter, and fill up landfills with materials that could be used again. Circling the planet is an astronaut with a recycling bin reaching for a paper airplane that says, “What we save, saves us.” What we recycle and reuse saves the Earth by conserving limited natural resources.

The large trees on either side of the Earth are an homage to the Tree of Life. When we recycle paper we help conserve trees which provide oxygen, shade, and a habitat for living things. Some of the animals represented in the trees are the red panda, chameleon, horse, snake, dolphin, and elephant. As we save the Earth we in turn benefit ourselves because we are all interconnected, making this an Earth worth saving.

Keep Dalton-Whitfield Beautiful is the local Keep America Beautiful affiliate striving to create a more vibrant, beautiful community. The non-profit focuses on initiatives for litter prevention, waste reduction and recycling, and community greening and beautification. They recently released an educational campaign about preventing litter called “Love it, don’t trash it!” #LiveLitterFree. Learn more at www.keepdaltonwhitfieldbeautiful.org.

1000 Words is a new initiative to promote and accelerate the growth of public art in Dalton. The initiative partners with local artist with the funding, location and community volunteers to create murals and sculptures around town. Program organizers want to give Dalton a voice through public art, accelerate beautification, instill pride in our community and inspire the next generation. Learn more about them and upcoming art collaborations at www.1000wordsdalton.com.

Artist: Henry Green, March 2016

Project Manager: Deanna Mathis

Sponsor: Keep Dalton Whitfield Beautiful (Liz Swafford, Anthony Cline)

Volunteers: Peter Mathis, Cathy Snyder, Malisa Cawood, Liz Swafford, Crawford McDonald, Julia Cagle, Marco Hernandez, Austin Laney, Adelina Martin, Andrea Rodriguez, Kevin Hernandez, Kevin Diaz, Lizett Porias, Jose Gutierrez


Be Peacock Proud - Reduce, Reuse, Recycle!

Artist: Volunteers from Keep Dalton-Whitfield Beautiful                                                  Sponsor: Dalton-Whitfield Solid Waste Authority

Rethink your waste…

Pearl the Peacock is one of the peacock statues placed in Downtown Dalton for Peacocks on Parade organized by the Downtown Dalton Development Authority.  Pearl was sponsored by the Dalton-Whitfield Solid Waste Authority and designed by volunteers from Keep Dalton-Whitfield Beautiful from 2011-12. 

Pearl the Peacock was decorated with items that are classified as trash, litter, or are actually recyclable.

When you Reuse them instead of throwing them away you get a beautiful work of art!

The grass on the front and back of the statue is a combination of astro turf and cigarette butts collected from Downtown Dalton.  Front View: Pearl’s legs were wrapped with telephone wire.  The feet have telephone wire and orange mesh produce bags.  The upper legs have six pack rings.  The chest is covered with aluminum can tabs.  Wings are outlined with decorative beads and made of circles cut out of plastic bags.  The lower wings have steel can lids, decorative jewels, plastic tub lids, and drinking cup lids.  The peacock feathers have stems made with drinking straws, telephone wire, six pack rings, and tulle.  The eyes for the feathers are plastic tub lids decorated with pellets, beads, and jewelry.   Back View: Bottle caps from a variety of plastic bottles were glued on the back along with thinner lids from plastic tubs to create colorful feathers.  The lower tail feathers were made from pieces of yellow and white foam from coffee cups, meat trays, and egg cartons.  The upper tail feathers were designed with aluminum foil lids from yogurt cups, medicine bottle, and other containers; plastic tub lids; six-pack rings; aluminum can tabs; and plastic drinking straws. 

front view

BACK VIEW


Yes, I know that I look just fabulous! I’m covered in amazing upcycled, repurposed, and reused materials that won’t be going to the landfill.
— Pearl the Peacock

Special Thanks to...

The following businesses for their support, advice, and materials:

  • Dalton-Whitfield Solid Waste Authority
  • Randy Bates at the Landmark Building for providing work space
  • Accent Yarns & Textiles, Inc.
  • Bates Furniture Co.
  • Dalton Marine, Inc.
  • Langford Appliance Parts & Services
  • Mike Young’s Body Shop
  • North Georgia Boat Repair
  • Young’s Body Shop
  • Peacock Alley, original work space

Volunteers who donated their art skills:

  • Keep Dalton-Whitfield Beautiful:  Patricia Edwards, Melva Purvis,Rachel Lord, Mae Jensen, Heidi Edwards, Bill Edwards, and Liz Swafford.
  • Dalton Middle School Students in Jane Pate’s art class, 2011-2012.
  • Southeast High School Students inMelody Vaden’s art class, 2011-2012.
  • Westside Elementary School students: Grace Zea Jensen, Charlotte Edwards, and Brad Edwards.
  • And, thanks to many others who donated items to decorate Pearl, and took the time to transport her to several locations.

 

Items on Pearl the Peacock...

  • Plastic six-pack rings
  • Pull tabs off soda cans
  • Plastic bottle tops
  • Christmas decorations
  • Mardi Gras beads
  • Polypropylene pellets (recycled from bottles)
  • Plastic Drinking Straws
  • Tub lids (nuts, dairy products)
  • Drink pouches (such as Capri Suns)
  • Packaging/bags (chips, fruit, vegetables, pet food, shopping)
  • Pull-off steel can lids
  • Styrofoam (cups, meat & egg cartons)
  • Cigarette butts
  • Astro Turf
  • Party decorations
  • Telephone Cords
  • Worn out dog leashes
  • Aluminum lids (vitamin seals, dairy products)
  • Costume Jewelry
  • Buttons; Chair Wheel
  • Keys, several sizes
  • Scissors, melted handle